i had my first anxiety on 2017 when i was in the last year in my high school and it lasted a year. the first symptoms i had was less sleep and when i sleep then wake up i would feel like i never had a sleep, another symptom was i had a racing heart beat that when i hear my pulse i would ask my self a lot of questions which would make me panic and make my pulse more faster. for that year i had the anxiety, i had reached a very high level in the anxiety like i used to talk to myself and ask what is happening to me, i used to google my symptoms and google would respond like i had a non-functioning glands and felt hopeless and would be like this forever. i used to cry a lot, but i had this part that made me feel better which was PRAYING. i started praying my 5 prayers everyday and reading Quran. After 2days i would sleep better, my pulse went back to normal and the most thing i missed a lot happiness. Afterwards i learnt how to control my anxiety and stress and whenever i feel some pressure i would do a pro-longed sujood and pray. the reason why posted this was i really feel you guys and when i read your posts, i saw myself in 2017 when i was hopeless so i wanted to tell you guys not to worry and you gonna have your life back and will be happy Insha Allah. just be connected to Allah
Without treatment, panic attacks tend to occur repeatedly for months or years. While they typically begin in young adulthood, the symptoms may arise earlier or later in life in some people. Complications, which are symptoms that can develop as a result of continued panic attacks and develop into other mental illnesses, may include specific irrational fears (phobias), especially of leaving home (agoraphobia) and avoidance of social situations. Other possible complications can include depression, work or school problems, suicidal thoughts or actions, financial problems, and alcohol or other substance abuse. For children and adolescents, panic disorder can even interfere with normal development. Panic disorder and other anxiety disorders also predispose sufferers to developing heart or gastrointestinal diseases, high blood pressure or diabetes, having more severe symptoms if they have a respiratory disease, and of dying prematurely.
Hi. i have just joined a new workplace and the working culture is very toxic. There is too much of negativity that i can sense in the new place. I am trying to avoid that but i am unable to. Due to this, i am most of the times depressed and as a result have started eating less and sleeping less. I do not have sound sleep and get panic attacks all day and night. i am not sure about the future and it seems all lost to me. I need to come out of the situation but do not know how to handle it. i tried meditation but it becomes very difficult once i close my eyes. do i need a therapist to come out of this situation?
Adoration Aesthetic emotions Affection Agitation Agony Amusement Anger Anguish Annoyance Anxiety Apathy Arousal Attraction Awe Boredom Calmness Compassion Contempt Contentment Defeat Depression Desire Disappointment Disgust Ecstasy Embarrassment Vicarious Empathy Enthrallment Enthusiasm Envy Euphoria Excitement Fear Flow (psychology) Frustration Gratitude Grief Guilt Happiness Hatred Hiraeth Homesickness Hope Horror Hostility Humiliation Hygge Hysteria Infatuation Insecurity Insult Interest Irritation Isolation Jealousy Joy Limerence Loneliness Longing Love Lust Melancholy Mono no aware Neglect Nostalgia Panic Passion Pity Pleasure Pride hubris Rage Regret Rejection Remorse Resentment Sadness Saudade Schadenfreude Sehnsucht Sentimentality Shame Shock Shyness Sorrow Spite Stress Suffering Surprise Sympathy Tenseness Wonder Worry
Yes, panic attacks are real and potentially quite emotionally disabling. Fortunately, they can be controlled with specific treatments. Because of the disturbing physical signs and symptoms that accompany panic attacks, they may be mistaken for heart attacks or some other life-threatening medical problem. In fact, up to 25% of people who visit emergency rooms because of chest pain are actually experiencing panic. This can lead to people with this symptom often undergoing extensive medical testing to rule out physical conditions. Sadly, sometimes more than 90% of these individuals are not appropriately diagnosed as suffering from panic.
People who have repeated, persistent attacks or feel severe anxiety about having another attack are said to have panic disorder. Panic disorder is strikingly different from other types of anxiety disorders in that panic attacks are often sudden and unprovoked.[18] However, panic attacks experienced by those with panic disorder may also be linked to or heightened by certain places or situations, making daily life difficult.[19]
Anxiety is becoming increasingly prolific in today’s society, particularly among young people. While everybody feels anxious at some point in their lives, anxiety disorders can be all-encompassing unless you seek help. But what exactly is anxiety, and how do you treat it? The main type of anxiety is referred to by health specialists as generalised anxiety disorder (GAD), which is characterised by continued feelings of worry, fear and unease that are present for much of the time and not restricted to specific situations.

Agoraphobia is often comorbid with panic disorder — meaning people often suffer from both conditions at the same time. It's an intense fear of not being able to escape whatever place you're in, and can often lead to an avoidance of leaving the house. People with agoraphobia can fear situations where this anxiety might flare up, and typically don't feel comfortable or safe in public, crowded places. 
Selective mutism: A somewhat rare disorder associated with anxiety is selective mutism. Selective mutism occurs when people fail to speak in specific social situations despite having normal language skills. Selective mutism usually occurs before the age of 5 and is often associated with extreme shyness, fear of social embarrassment, compulsive traits, withdrawal, clinging behavior, and temper tantrums. People diagnosed with selective mutism are often also diagnosed with other anxiety disorders.
×